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How To Chop Cilantro

CookingMyWay's picture

Just another one of my dumb a** how to videos... There is a funny camera mishap a the end though...

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Chopping Cilantro
Do you know how to chop cilantro? It is a very easy to do procedure that can be done within few minutes. Watch the video and learn how to chop cilantro.

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10 Comments

shantihhh's picture
In Thai cooking you often use the cilantro roots which you pund into a paste. Great flavour!
Ginny69's picture
Cilantro is one of the ingredients i use to make sofrito which is use common in many Spanish dishes.
CookingMyWay's picture
Sofrito = Yum!
shantihhh's picture
Then there is Culantro! It is also used in Vietamese cooking in salad her combinations. It is a popular herb in Peurto Rico-a stronger flavour than cilantro.
CookingMyWay's picture
I've used Culantro before but it's really hard to find in Jax. There's only one market that gets it in and they don't have a steady supply of it...
Lauren.Groveman's picture
I'm so glad you mentioned that the stems of cilantro are just as edible as the leaves. So often, people will remove all the stems, thinking they will be overly strong, like parsley. Parsley stems are a bit bitter tasting but cilantro stems taste just like the leaves. The leaves, though, add a lighter texture and prettier look than using just stems. Cilantro is one of those herbs that can truly transform a dish..meaning, it can create spin on the taste. If you're used to eating a tomato topping for garlic toast (for a savory crostini, for example) and you'd like to make a change, but keep things similar, just use cilantro instead of basil, minced jalapeno instead of roasted red bell peppers...and Presto! Delish...LG
Lauren.Groveman's picture
I'm so glad you mentioned that the stems of cilantro are just as edible as the leaves. So often, people will remove all the stems, thinking they will be overly strong, like parsley. Parsley stems are a bit bitter tasting but cilantro stems taste just like the leaves. The leaves, though, add a lighter texture and prettier look than using just stems. Cilantro is one of those herbs that can truly transform a dish..meaning, it can create spin on the taste. If you're used to eating a tomato topping for garlic toast (for a savory crostini, for example) and you'd like to make a change, but keep things similar, just use cilantro instead of basil, minced jalapeno instead of roasted red bell peppers...and Presto! Delish...LG
HotChef's picture
April Evans Hamburg Parsley is another good one for this. Booth the tops and roots are a culinary treat.
Anonymous's picture
Culantro=Cilantro As with anything, different varieties have different tastes. Although it got to America from Europe, Spanish cuisine (as in "Spain") does not use cilantro leaves at all. Many LatAm "Spanish speaking" countries (not all of them) do use cilantro leaves extensively.
Anonymous's picture
Cool