You are here

Cultural Food New York, November 2007

The.Tortilla.Guy's picture


 

 

 

 

 

More than 10,000 professional attendees, exhibitors, and press attend event
More than 10,000 professional attendees, exhibitors, and press converged on the collocated Cultural Food New York event featuring Kosherfest, Expo Comida Latina and All Asia Food. The events were held at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York City, November 11-12 downstairs from the International Hotel/Motel Show.

"The surge of attendance confirms the ever-growing demand for these important categories of food and beverage for kosher, Hispanic, Asian and Organics," said Brian Randall, Show Director.

More than 700 exhibiting companies displayed the very latest in kosher, Asian and Hispanic food, wines, beverages and equipment showcasing thousands of products from more than 20 nations. This was the first time that all three shows exhibited together under its new brand name, Cultural Food Expo/New York. Cultural Food Expo also took place earlier this year in Los Angeles. View photos of the event >>

 

 

Healthy and Organic from Chef LaLa
Chef LaLa demonstrated "Heart Healthy Cuisine" with her baked milk-based Dulce de Leche, her Chipotle Orange-Caramelized Chicken, and her Tuna Tartar, all the while showing us how to use and re-use our food to prevent throwing away the typical 30% of food considered "waste".

 

CULTURAL FOOD NEW YORK 2007

RECORD Number of Food & Beverage Professionals Convene at Diversified’s Cultural Food New York Events

More than 10,000 national retailers, distributors, manufacturers, foodservice professionals and exhibitors flocked to the only ethnic food and beverage trade event in on the East Coast, to see aisles of new and tasty authentic foods and beverages from more than 25 countries.   

Rate This

Your rating: None
4.408335
Average: 4.4 (6 votes)

11 Comments

AnjaliD's picture
As a owner of a small business, I need to attend conventions and Expo like these BUT the booths are so expensive that a small business like mine cannot afford it. Every time I read abt a Expo, I always struggle with this issue of "Need to attend but cannot afford the booth".
The.Tortilla.Guy's picture
Attending is much different than showing !! most can walk througha show at a small cost or have some one in the business invite them. To show products you do really need to be a medium sized company to afford these, in the major cities The Tortilla Guy
shantihhh's picture
Anjali You can easily become show broke and loose your shirt. I see it happen many times. Your best bet is to get media coverage-as that is free advertising! Both print and internet are needed. In the future, well who knows if print will even exist. So mny magazines are suffering from dropping subscription rates, and newspapers-well they are in a serious downward spiral into a black hole. Also perhaps the number one way to "advertise" today is word of mouth! Shanti/Mary-Anne
The.Tortilla.Guy's picture
You must pick and choose the show that you want very carefully - also one must budget monies in for this. At first start in smaller cities and doing weekend consumer shows The Tortilla Guy
AnjaliD's picture
You are right Shanti. "Word-of-mouth" marketing is the best, cheapest and the most effective. have one satisfied customer and he/she will go and tells his/her experience to 5 other friends. Lot of my customers have come to me via this route. And I think its a very good sign. But to grow more, my products do need more exposure. I need to try and get more media coverage. I am not sure how though.
shantihhh's picture
media kits/press releases, get chef's to endorse the product like Hari did Shanti/Mary-Anne
shantihhh's picture
Manufacturers deal in large bulk quantities. Might not be the business for her, as she is doing small consumer put-ups, but a great business with her sourcingcontacts. If you do a show be sure you can handle a large volumne of orders. Most people who attend these shows are retailers both large and small, manufactures, and of course some media types. Exhibiting at a show is only a small part of the business process. Can you ship within a short time frame or do you need a long lead time for orders? Say you wrote 500 orders ranging from $200 to $5000 each, could you ship? Can you carry the credit? What are your minimums? Do you have a credit policy set up? It isn't just exhibiting. It is indeed a serious commitment and a choice to take your business to an immediate larger scale. Of course then your costs rise and you may make the same amount of profit for 10 fold more work. All things that must be considered. Exhibting is the easy part. Do you want to use sales reps or not, or distributors? That is one of 100 issues that must be considered and weighed and decided upon prior to even doing one show. Approaching retailers in your area is a possible first step or developing a major retailer or catalog account as a base for your business. Of course a major account only can be dangerous as if you loose than zap goes the business. Whereas if you have a 1000 small accounts as abase and you loose a couple, no big deal. BTW reatilers remember they expect a 50% min. discount over your direct to consumer pricing and distribotors around 25% Your product line is an easy cross over of gift and gourmet. Shanti/Mary-Anne
AnjaliD's picture
Getting into gift and gourmet sounds interesting. I need to look more into that. I think I am leaning more towards the idea of staying away from distributors and retailers.
shantihhh's picture
AND how much money you have to invest and how long you can carry the business with virtually no income for perhaps 18 months. If investment funds are plentiful-go for it, otherwise do NOT risk your ability to provide for yourself. I have been in the import-wholesale-retail-mail order catalog business for over 20 years. I was Director of a large wholesale importer as well as National Sales Manager for them before that (in gifts and gourmet), then I was VP of Merchandising and Marketing which included designing products, their packaging, and sourcing for manufacturing for a large mail order catalog group (gift-gourmet-home decor arena). My background is in speciality markets not mass merchants. Your product line certainly isn't for the mass market like Wallmart. Perhaps such as a William Sonoma could be a customer in time as your infrastructure could accomodate their lofty demands. I still think you need a good customer base to build upon - a mixture of direct sales as you are doing now plus a few geographially non-competing retail accounts. Hey in time you could do private label for some of the foodie retailers. I am not trying to dissuade you from any market-just to caution you to consider carefully all the ramifications and go forward wisely that is unless you have endless funds to play with. It is always different when youare a large corporation and test a new product when you have the reputation and distribution in place as Tamaro has i.e. Steve's employer a very large and successful high volumne player in the grocery business which is quite a different market. It is high volumne and low margins, whereas a speciality gourmet item such as yours has higher margins much closer to he gift industry and far lower volumne for sure. There is one manufacturing segment that is also specaility that could be a perfect target customer! Let's take this off iFood.TV as I am sure it is a real bore to 99.9% here. Shanti/Mary-Anne
AnjaliD's picture
I need to get in touch with you Mary-Ann. I can learn a lot from you. Will send you a private message. Anjali
shantihhh's picture
yes media kits work wonders! Free endorsement is great. The media kit needs a professional presentation. We'll talk! I have done so much of this over the years. All began when I was VP of BIA Cordon Bleu 20 years back and I spent as much as I made VBG Shanti/Mary-Anne