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Genuine Dill Pickles

Southern.Crockpot's picture
<p><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/maggiemuddphotography/4347393210/">Image Credit</a></p>
Ingredients
  Pickling cucumbers 20 Pound
  Pickling salt 1 3⁄4 Cup (28 tbs)
  Vinegar 1 1⁄2 Cup (24 tbs)
  Mixed pickling spice 4 Tablespoon
  Sugar 1⁄4 Cup (4 tbs)
  Dill with seed 3 Bunch (300 gm)
  Grape leaves 10
Directions

Wash, rinse and drain the cucumbers.
Combine the salt, vinegar, spice, sugar and 10 quarts water in a large container.
Stir to dissolve the salt.
Place 1 or 2 layers of cucumbers in a glass or stoneware crock or jar or a tight, well-scalded, odorless wooden keg.
Add some of the dill and 3 or 4 fresh grape leaves, if available.
Repeat process until all the cucumbers are in the container.
Leave at least 3 inches headspace.
Add brine to cover the cucumbers.
Use a glass or ceramic plate which will fit inside the container to hold the cucumbers under the brine.
Fill a fruit jar with water and use as a weight to hold the plate down.
Cover the container with a thin cloth and store in a dry, well-ventilated place.
Check the container every day and remove scum which forms on top of the brine.
Add brine, if needed, to keep the cucumbers well covered.
Let stand for 3 to 4 weeks for the pickles to develop even color and good flavor.
A small red pepper, a few sprigs of dill and 1 teaspoon light mustard seed may be added to each quart jar of pickles.
Pack the pickles to within 1/2 inch of the tops of the jars.
Strain the brine and boil for 5 minutes, then pour over the pickles to about 1/4 inch from the tops of the jars.
Wipe off the top or threads of the jars.
Place the lids on the jars and screw bands tight.
Process for 15 minutes in boiling water.

Recipe Summary

Cuisine: 
European
Course: 
Side Dish
Storage: 
Preserving
Servings: 
296

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2 Comments

Vicki Leonard's picture
Is the brine on these pickles supposed to be cloudy?
Samina.Tapia's picture
Cloudy is perfectly normal. If the brine doesn't get cloudy you aren't making pickles! Some scum is on the surface is also fine. If it does not smell nasty, taste the brine, ad long as it does not taste bad. Some people say that clouding happens as a byproduct of fermentation, others say it's because of anti-caking agents in some types of salts