You are here

Rhodes Across Indian Recipes

shantihhh's picture

Rhodes Across India recipes

Explore real Indian cuisine from pavements to palaces with these authentic recipes that showcase the very best regional specialities.


Royal Palace

Royal Palace

Brought to India by Mughal rulers, the cooking style of royal palace kitchens owes much to a Middle Eastern culinary heritage. Richly indulgent, there’s an emphasis on succulent meats, aromatic spices, nut pastes, and floral scents rather than fiery chilli heat.
Barbecued Quail
Sailana Junglee Murgh (Chicken with Red Chillies)
Sher Bagh Pasande (Pot Roast Spiced Lamb)


Punjabi

Punjabi

Earthy, wholesome and full-flavoured, Punjabi cooking celebrates everyday cooking with Indian flatbreads, slow-cooked lentils, and fried onion, ginger and garlic masalas. Many people believe murgh makhani (arguably Punjab’s favourite dish) is the forerunner to Britain’s love affair with chicken tikka masala.
Murgh Pistadah (Pistachio-Marinated Chicken)
Shahi Maanh Daal (Creamy Black Lentils)
Murgh Makhani (Butter Chicken)
Paneer Tikka (Grilled Paneer)


Coastal

Coastal

Goan cooking has been shaped by Portuguese traditions; spicy takes on balchao (pickled prawns), peri peri masala, and perennial favourite - pork vindaloo. Also expect creamy coconut masalas, pounded chilli pastes, crackling curry leaves, popped mustard seeds, and tart tamarind. Coastal dishes work best with rice-based staples rather than North Indian breads.
Goan Chicken with Herbs
Pomfret Recheado (Barbecued Spiced Pomfret)
Crab Peri Peri
Pork Vindaloo


Mughlai

Mughlai

Royal palaces have traditionally flown the flag for sumptuous yet refined cooking styles which combine Indian spices with a Middle Eastern heritage. In their heyday, cooks would compete with each other to create the most decadent of dishes – rice pilaus made with slivers of pistachio nuts instead of grains, and gold leaf-anointed kebabs.
Qorma Bahadur Shahi (Lamb Korma)
Kakori Kebab
Qaliya Mehtabi (Creamy Chicken Curry with Almonds)


Gujarati

Gujarati

Gujarat is home to some of the finest vegetarian cooking styles. Almost seventy per cent of Gujaratis are vegetarian and dishes are typified by sweet and sour flavours. Lentils and savoury dishes are usually sweetened with jaggery and often flecked with mustard seeds, curry leaves, and tamarind. Meals are served on large thalis – round steel platters with smaller bowls filled with veggie side dishes around the edge.
Potato and Green Pea Pattice
Gram Dal Fritters with Yogurt Kadhi
Coconut Okra


Parsee

Parsee

After fleeing Persia in the 10th century the majority of Parsees made their home in western India where they continued to practice their Zoroastrian faith. Parsees are big meat eaters and have a fondness for eggs, curries sweetened with dried fruit, and tangy flavour combinations.
Patrani Machi (Coconut Pomfret)
Akoori (Spiced Scrambled Egg)
Jardaloo ma Gosht (Lamb and Apricot Curry)


Bengali

Bengali

Indian Bengalis exhibit great pride in their cooking – especially the fish and seafood preparations. Expect dishes to have an astringent flavour, and to be emboldened by frequent forays with turmeric spice rubs, pounded mustard seed masalas, and smoky mustard oil. Sweetmeats from this region are renowned and are usually milk-based offerings, often drenched in rose-scented syrup.
Sorshe Maach (Mustard Fish)
Chingrir Malai (Prawn Curry)
Phoolkopir Shinghara (Cauliflower Samosas)
Bhapa Doi (Jaggery Yogurt)


Marwari

Marwari

All Marwari dishes are vegetarian and prepared without onion and garlic, which are believed to promote lusty thoughts! Their style of cooking is a triumph over the Rajasthan desert’s often meagre resources and is notable for its minimal use of tomatoes and abundance of yogurt or buttermilk instead of water (often in short supply).
Watermelon Pickle
Khatta Meetha Seethaphal (Sweet and Sour Pumpkin)
Aloo Methi (Potatoes with Mustard Greens)
Mewa Ki Kheer (Rice Pudding)


Street food

Street food

From puffed rice snacks to smoky kebabs, creamy kulfis to chilled fruit salads – India is a nation of munchers and tea breaks of samosas and piping hot chai are commonplace. Pavement stalls provide staples too – from dal (spiced lentils) served with a stack of rotis to regal biryanis – there’s a dish for everyone.
Pau Bhaji (Spicy Mashed Vegetables)
Channa Masala (Spicy Chickpea Curry)
Amritsari Machchi (Spiced Battered Kingfish)
Kathi Kebab (Chicken and Egg Paratha Rolls)

for recipes, videos and techniques:

http://uktv.co.uk/food/stepbystep/aid/591792

Rate This

Your rating: None
3.9
Average: 3.9 (15 votes)

10 Comments

CookingMyWay's picture
Great post!
Ganesh.Dutta's picture
hey shanti, many punjabi, gujarati and other dishes are also available on ifood.tv . Example: http://www.ifood.tv/recipe/paneer_tikka_sabji By the way , thanks for this nice blog!
shantihhh's picture
I am having a grand time going through all the amazing recipes here!
Petal's picture
Wow, amazing. Very informative post. You have done a great job in describing the subtleties of various Indian cuisines.
shantihhh's picture
Petal I love Indian cuisines and cooking them, especially Awadhi-the old Moghuli style dishes which take all day. I only do this once in awhile, but the results are amazing! Next time I make Kundan Kaliya including making Lazzat-e-Taam I'll post photos/video of this glorious dish. I'll use silver not gold leaf on it, but fresh mutton/goat is readily available here. I must find mittha ittr.
HotChef's picture
Chef Gary is hot, i worked for him when i was in school
TAUSIF ARBAZ's picture
Very Good
Notrub's picture
I've just watched Rhodes do his Bengali episode on TV and was quite perplexed at his arrogance and attitude towards the Indian lady who was showing him her recipes from the region. Here he is being shown the dishes and the ingredients that go into them, and he is telling her that he thinks there is too much of a particular ingredient being added. And then he decides to add lemon juice because 'he' wants too even though the guest chef would probably not have... the look she gave him was priceless. What rudeness on his part.
afreen's picture
Gary, is a world class chef.. Watched his episode of mughlai dishes, it was amazeng.. I realy like d way he cooks. He is so much interested in indian cuisine from all d states.. Its realy vry inspirng. M definately gonna try his dishes..
shantihhh's picture
afreen, Is "d" meaning "the" ? If so why not use two more keystrokes.....burns calories :-) vry= ? vry = ? Sorry I have graduate degrees in computer Science, and proudly speak English as you do. Why use silly acronyms? Being polite has certainly not disappeared, especially in India I HOPE!