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Driving Through Ramadan On Empty Stomach!

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Ramadan fasting

Try driving for 12 hours on an empty stomach, not even a sip of water or a puff of cigarette. Worried already? Well, this may be an unlikely scenario for people from other religions, but for Muslims all over the world, including those in America, this is the way of life for at least a month every year. That is why the most favorite part of the day for these drivers is breaking the fast, as you can see in the picture above.

 

 


Ramadan Fasting

The month is called Ramadan and it is the hardest on those drivers, who have to drive 12 hours amidst mind-numbing traffic, on an empty stomach. therefore, there is every chance that the next cab that you pick for yourself may be driven by a driver who has had nothing to eat for many hours. There are thousands of such drivers driving around New York and other American cities.

 

 


Breaking the Fast

After a rigorous day-long fast, they gather at their local mosque at sundown and offer prayers before breaking fast with the customary dates. Often drivers eat something soft, like sweet rice pudding, before embarking upon a feast of richer dishes. It is good for the stomach after a day's fast. After all, their metabolism needs to get kick-started but in an easy way.

 

 


Ramadan & Restraint

In fact, Ramadan, known as the month of fasting and restraint, is also a testing period for the New York cabbies, who have to continue dealing with the dally hurdles in human behavior while trying to keep their cool through it all. One such driver explains, "When someone cusses on you, you have to let it go. When someone wants to have drama with you, you have to let it go - those are the principles of Ramadan." Although, these fasting drivers eat everything that they can get their hands on, we assume that it is the top 10 Ramadan desserts that they want to end their meals with.

 

 

As for the food, the drivers gorge on the delicacies of their native countries, be it korma, curry, biryani, or samosas. Such drivers come from countries like India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Indonesia, etc and the local cuisines of these countries play a vital role in providing the much-needed daily sustenance to these fasting drivers.

 

Image Courtesy: indianmuslimobserver

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