You are here

Did You Have Your ‘Electrified’ Lemonade?

FitGal's picture


LemonadeHave you ever had a lemonade with electric current passing through it? Before you throw up your last meal, be informed that this gastronomic twist was displayed at the "Computer Human Interaction Conference" in Austin, Texas, where Japanese researchers are at it again. After inventing a pair of dieting goggles recently, the researchers are trying to find out whether electrifying a food item makes it less sugary or more salty. Read on to know more...


 


1) The Electrification


 


At the Austin conference, the researchers put a live wire into lemonade and cubes of cheese and left it for review. The principle behind this research is to device a method of “electrification of food” so that those with health conditions like diabetes are also able to enjoy their food like the healthy people. As you can see in the video given below, a wire is poking out of a cup of lemonade. This seven-volt-wire is attached to a device that can control the electricity flow. Before the reviewers took up the taste test, they were made to sign a waiver. It is a different matter altogether that one of the reviewers bit into the wire itself and received a mild shock, all in the name of science!


 


2) The Results


 


The reviewer on the video is Nick Barber, who took the lemonade test first. He says, “It tastes like there’s a tingle on my tongue. It tastes different. It’s a very interesting experiment.” He also took the cheese test but accidentally also bit into the wire electrifying the cheese, although he was clever enough not to show that part on the video. Speaking about the taste tests on both lemonade and cheese, Barber said, “Taste change in solid foods was difficult to perceive because I would have needed to be chewing the food with the fork in my mouth to electrify it.


 


3) The Man Behind the Experiment


 


Hiromi Nakamura, a student of the Meiji University, is the brain behind this electrified food. He followed the principle that electricity gives rise to a deeper salt in a food or drink to conduct these experiments. In his opinion, this principle could have varied dietary applications in future. Speaking about the experiment, Nakamura said, “When the electricity was added to the lemonade, the drink was supposed to become more salty.” One of the main reasons why Nakamura undertook this experiment is to help a person control his diet with the help of technology. Since electricity has not calorific value of itself, it does not add anything to the chemical make up of the food, adds Nakamura. However, his project is still in the research stage and he has still not received any commercial backing from anywhere.



Passing electricity through your food and drink may sound a bit extreme but the intentions behind this experiment are all good. Considering that the Japanese are one of the slimmest races on the earth, it might do you good to listen to them for once.


Video Courtesy: youtube.com


Image Courtesy: dailycaller.com

Rate This

Your rating: None
4.283335
Average: 4.3 (3 votes)

2 Comments

Anonymous's picture
Interesting! But I wonder whether people would like their sweet drinks turn salty.
FitGal's picture
This technique may not be for the normal people but if someone is trying to lose weight, they will surely find it handy.