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Involve Your Guests With Mizutaki

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Ingredients
  Boneless beef sirloin/1 1/2 pounds pork tenderloin, trimmed of fat 1 1⁄2 Pound, trimmed of fat, cut 1 1/2 to 2 inches thick
  Chicken thighs/3 whole chicken breasts , about 3 pound total 2 Pound (6 Thighs)
  Slender carrots 6
  Cauliflower head/1/2 pound edible-pod peas 1 1⁄2 Pound (1/2 Head)
  Green onions 8
  Shiitake mushrooms/Fresh button mushrooms 1⁄2 Pound (Fresh)
  Spinach/Watercress 1 Pound
  Tofu 1⁄2 Pound (Medium Or Firm)
  Homemade chicken broth/Canned regular-strength chicken / beef broth 8 Cup (128 tbs)
  Mizutaki sauce 1⁄4 Cup (4 tbs)
  Hot cooked rice 8 Cup (128 tbs)
Directions

Cut beef or pork across the grain into 1/8- to 1/4-inch-thick slices.
Skin and bone chicken; cut meat across the grain into 1/8- to 1/4-inch-thick slices.
Wrap beef and chicken separately and refrigerate.
Scrub or peel carrots and thinly slice diagonally.
Separate cauliflower into flowerets; break flowerets into small bite-size pieces or slice lengthwise.
(Or, if using peas, remove ends and strings.) Trim root ends from onions; then cut onions, including tops, into 2-inch lengths.
Rinse mushrooms and pat dry.
Cut off and discard tough shiitake stems.
Slice mushrooms about 1/4 inch thick.
Discard tough spinach (or watercress) stems and any yellow or wilted leaves.
Wash remaining leaves well; drain.
Arrange vegetables on a large tray, grouping each kind separately.
Cover with damp paper towels, then with plastic wrap; refrigerate for up to 8 hours.
To set up the dinner table, place cooker in center of table within easy reach of all diners.
If you use a Mizutaki cooker, be sure it's designed for cooking, not decoration.
Also called Mongolian hotpot, the cooker has a ring-shaped moat with a lid, mounted on a small, chimney-vented charcoal brazier.
If you don't have a mizutaki cooker, use an electric wok, electric frying pan, or 4- to 5-quart pan on a portable electric or butane burner.
Drain tofu and cut into 1/2-inch cubes.
Arrange beef, chicken, and tofu on a tray.
Place trays of prepared foods, uncovered, on table beside cooker.
At each place, have a small plate, a small bowl about 1/3 full of Mizutaki Sauce (pour remaining sauce into a small pitcher and set on the table); a small covered bowl for hot rice; and chopsticks, tongs, or individual strainer ladles.
Mizutaki cookers are charcoal-fueled, so if you use one, the room must be very well ventilated; be sure there are at least several open win- dows.
To protect table from heat, set cooker in a wide, shallow dish (such as a clay flowerpot saucer) filled with at least 1 inch water.
Heat broth to boiling in the kitchen; fill moat about % full of broth.
Then place 6 to 8 ignited charcoal briquets on fire grate in chimney and top with 2 or 3 more unlit briquets (if moat is empty, pan can be damaged by heat).
To use other pans, fill 2/3 full (or with 2 to 3 inches) of broth.
Keep broth boiling.
Fill bowls with hot rice.
The host or hostess can begin the first round of cooking, filling pan with some of each food, starting with the slower cooking carrots and cauliflower and ending with meat.
Cover pan and let cook until chicken is no longer pink in center, 3 to 5 minutes.
Remove hd; let guests fish out portions, a bite at a time.
Dip each bite in Mizutaki Sauce, then eat with rice.
As the pan is emptied, guests choose and add more foods and cook them to taste.
Add hot broth to pan as needed to maintain liquid level.
Offer extra Mizutaki Sauce to replenish servings.
When appetites are satisfied, turn off heat (cover chimney of Mizutaki cooker to snuff, but be sure some liquid remains in moat as long as coals are hot).
Ladle the enriched broth into sauce cups, adding more sauce as desired, and sip as a delectable conclusion to the main course.

Recipe Summary

Cuisine: 
Japanese
Method: 
Boiled
Ingredient: 
Beef

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