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Quince Honey

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Ingredients
  Quince 3 Pound
  Water 7 1⁄2 Cup (120 tbs)
  Sugar 3 Cup (48 tbs)
Directions

Select barely ripe, firm sound quince.
Wash thoroughly.
If there are wormy portions, trim off and discard before weighing.
Cut quince in quarters, flick out the seeds and discard.
Peel and remove cores and combine cores and peels in one saucepan.
Cut quince in thin slices or grate on a coarse grater.
There should be about 21/2 cups of quince slices, and 2 cups combined cores and peels.
Add 41/2 cups water to the quince slices, cover and boil gently for 20 to 25 minutes or until tender.
Add 3 cups water to the cores and peels, cover and' cook rapidly for 20 minutes; strain through a pouch made of several thicknesses of cheesecloth or a clean muslin bag and add the strained juice to the cooked quince slices.
There should be about 6 1/2 cups combined juice and quince.
Add sugar and boil uncovered for 35 to 40 minutes until thick and a rich garnet colored honey is obtained.
(It may be necessary to add more water, 1/4 cup at a time, if the syrup begins to get too thick before the rich color is obtained.) Pour into hot sterilized jelly glasses, pour thin layer hot paraffin over top.
Apply second thin layer paraffin when first has set.
2 pints from another year as they give a dusty flavor rather than a clean, fresh tang Soft water is recommended if it can be obtained clean and safe.
A high proportion of mineral salts in water may prevent proper acid fermentation in the brined pickles, and iron in the water may blacken them.
The preserving kettle should be enamelware, aluminum, or of any material other than copper or iron.
A copper kettle gives the pickles a vivid green color which indicates the presence of copper salts.
Since copper in this form is definitely harmful to the body, this vivid color should be avoided rather than sought after by the housewife.

Recipe Summary

Cuisine: 
American
Method: 
Boiled

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