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Konigsberger Klopse

John04's picture
Here I am posting a special Konigsberger Klopse recipe for you. This dish is equally liked by my friends as well, and whenever we meet on weekends we surely try this dish. It really tastes good. If you too want to enjoy the weekend, you can try out this Konigsberger Klopse recipe.
Ingredients
  Ground beef 2 Pound (Of Half Beef And Half Pork)
  Bread roll/Bread slice 2 (Soaked In Water)
  Eggs 2
  Worcestershire sauce 2 Teaspoon
  Onion 2
  Butter 3 Tablespoon
  Flour 3 Tablespoon
  Water 200 Milliliter
  Lemon slices 4
  Capers 2 Teaspoon
  Sour cream 4 Tablespoon
  Pepper To Taste
  Salt To Taste
Directions

Stage1-Squeeze water out of bread. Mix all ingredients for meatballs and form into 1 1/2 inch balls.

Stage2-To prepare gravy, add flour to melted butter, stirring constantly. When lumps are completely dissolved, stir in water (amount depends on desired thickness of gravy).

Stage3-Bring to boil, then reduce heat. Add meatballs and simmer for 30 minutes.

Stage4-Remove meatballs and lemon slices, then add sour cream and mix well. Replace meatballs and serve.

Recipe Summary

Difficulty Level: 
Easy
Cuisine: 
German
Course: 
Main Dish
Method: 
Boiled
Dish: 
Curry
Interest: 
Holiday, Everyday
Ingredient: 
Egg
Preparation Time: 
10 Minutes
Cook Time: 
40 Minutes
Ready In: 
50 Minutes
Servings: 
4

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2 Comments

Snigdha's picture
From Wikipedia Königsberger Klopse (or Klöpse), also known as Soßklopse, are a German dish consisting of meatballs in a white sauce with capers. They are named after the formerly German city of Königsberg (now Kaliningrad) and originate from the East Prussian cuisine. The meatballs are made from ground beef or ground pork (sometimes mixed with either ground salted herring or ground anchovy), onions, eggs, and spices. The meatballs are cooked in salt water, and the resulting broth is mixed with roux, cream, and egg yolk to which capers are added. The dish is usually served with boiled potatoes or rice.
Orson Herrmann's picture
My mother made Konigsberger klopse regularly. She came from Tilset East Prussia, Germany. She used whole kernals of allspice in the sauce. Sometimes buttermilk was used. The yellow of the egg added color. It was often served with saltz kartophel.