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Celebrity Food Names

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Here is the start of a blog that we all can participate in :


Foods That are named after People


Prince Albert Filet of Beef
This method of preparing a beef filet was named in honor of Queen Victoria’s significant other, Prince Albert. It is considered a part of classic English cuisine and appears on menus in British hotels and restaurants. It is a pounded beef filet, rolled around a filling of pate de foie gras and then wrapped with bacon and braised in stock.



 

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Fettucini Alfredo Alfredo di Lelio was an early 20th century Italian chef who invented this dish for his wife that cardiologists today refer to as a "heart attack on a plate." He invented sometime between 1914-1920 and served it in his restaurant in Rome. The dish became famous when Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks praised it to the skies after their visit to Rome in 1927. The original recipe contained no cream sauce, only several types of butters. The Tortilla Guy
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which famous italian leader had a biscuit named after him x
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Eggs Benedict: There are two stories associated with this delicious breakfast. One version credits Lemuel Benedict, a New York stockbroker who went for breakfast at the Waldorf Astoria one day in 1894 while suffering from a hangover. He asked for a special dish of toast, bacon, poached eggs and Hollandaise sauce on the side. As the story goes, Oscar the maitre d’ adapted it for the Waldorf menu by substituting English muffin and ham, adding truffles and christening it after the sodden stockbroker. Another version dates back to 1893 when Charles Ranhofer, head chef at Delmonico’s Restaurant, created the dish especially for Mr. and/or Mrs. LeGrand Benedict, New York stockbroker and socialite. A Germanic variation of the dish exists as well named Eggs Benedict XVI after Pope Benedict XVI. His version calls for rye bread and sausage or saubrauten replacing the English muffins and Canadian bacon. The Tortilla Guy
Joe.Bush's picture
I assume Tortilla was named after a gentleman called The Tortilla Guy.
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I would like to think that also The Tortilla Guy
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Bing Cherry: This cherry was developed around 1875 by a horticulturist from Oregon named Seth Luelling. His assistant, a Manchurian named Bing, was immortalized for his help (but he couldn’t sing like another Bing of later years). The Tortilla Guy
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Caesar Salad: This salad has absolutely nothing to do with the Roman Emperor, Julius Caesar except perhaps as the source of the creator’s first name. Caesar Cardini immigrated to San Diego after World War One and opened a restaurant in Tijuana to avoid the prohibition laws in the US. He is thought to have originated this dish without anchovies in 1924. Others claim to be the salad’s inventor including Cardini’s business partner, his brother and one of his young chef apprentices who swore it was his mother’s recipe. The Tortilla Guy
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Chateaubriand: Vicomte Francois René de Chateaubriand (1768-1848) was a French writer and diplomat who once served as ambassador to England. Chateaubriand refers to both a cut and a recipe for steak created round 1822. The Tortilla Guy
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Clementines: Although this fruit may have originated centuries ago in Asia, this natural mutation of the mandarin orange is named for Pére Pierre Clément, a French monk living in North Africa at the beginning of the 20th century. It is not known whether he found the orange in its natural state or created a hybrid of the mandarin and Seville oranges. It is known this fruit bears no relation to the miner’s daughter who drowned in that American folk song, Clementine. The Tortilla Guy
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Cobb Salad: The owner of the Brown Derby restaurant, Robert H. Cobb, is said to have invented this salad in 1836-37 as a late night snack for himself. The Tortilla Guy
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DuBarry Cream Soup: Madame DuBarry, consort of Louis XV of France, had several dishes named after her, often involving cauliflower as in this soup. The cauliflower is said to have been a reference to her most elaborate powdered wigs. The Tortilla Guy
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Salad à la Dumas: The noted French author, Alexander Dumas, was a favorite of Delmonico’s chef, Charles Ranhofer. There are also timbales, stewed woodcock and mushrooms named after the creator of the Three Musketeers and the Man In The Iron Mask. The Tortilla Guy
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Graham Crackers: These crackers are named after a 19th century Presbyterian minister named Sylvester Graham. They epitomize his belief in a puritan lifestyle based on tee-totaling, vegetarianism and whole wheat. (He ate the crackers often, but how many parties he was invited to in his lifetime remains a moot point.) The Tortilla Guy
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Bombe Grimaldi: This frozen, kummel flavored dessert was probably named after a 19th century member or relative of Monaco’s Grimaldi family. The Tortilla Guy
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Cherry Garcia Ice Cream: Ben and Jerry created this ice cream flavor in homage to Jerry Garcia (1942-1995), who was the leader of the Grateful Dead rock band. The Tortilla Guy
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Garibaldi Biscuits: These English biscuits, named after the famous patriot and leader of the drive to unite Italy, were created after his very popular visit to England in 1864. There is also a French sauce with mustard and anchovies and a consommé named after him. The Tortilla Guy
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Hass Avocado: Rudolph Hass was a postal worker from California who back in the 1920s set out to grow a number of avocado trees in his backyard. One of the seedlings he bought was a variant that produced fruit, which was a bit unique. In 1935 he patented this variety of avocado, which now comprises 75% of US avocado production. The Tortilla Guy
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Heath Bar: This American "English toffee" bar is named for Bayard and Everett Heath, two Illinois confectioners who developed it back in the 1920s. It eventually became very popular throughout the country. The Tortilla Guy
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Oh Henry! The Williamson Candy Company of Chicago introduced this candy bar back in 1920. It was named for a young man who did odd jobs for the company store who was summoned by those words. The Tortilla Guy
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Timbales à la Irving The chef at Delmonico’s (Charles Ranhofer), named this dish of meat or fish in a creamy sauce baked and served in a pastry shell after American author, Washington Irving. The Tortilla Guy
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Apricots with Rice à la Jefferson: The famous chef from Delmonico’s struck again with this special dessert named after the third president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826). This dish is made with Jefferson rice, a strain indigenous to Texas. Jefferson was very interested in improving the rice culture in the United States and he actually smuggled Piedmont rice out of Italy! The Tortilla Guy
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John Dory: This is the English name for a saltwater fish that is also known as Saint Peter’s fish. It is said to be a reference to St. Peter’s job as doorkeeper to the pearly gates of heaven. Legend claims that the spots on the fish are either the apostle’s fingerprints or part of a story from the Gospel of Luke, which tells of a coin St Peter found in the fish’s mouth. (References to gift horses and mouths were from a later version of yet another book.) The Tortilla Guy
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Kaiser Rolls: About 1497 a Viennese baker made these rolls for Emperor Frederick IV whose profile was stamped on the top. The Tortilla Guy
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Chicken à la King: There are several claims to this dish, none of which can be authenticated. One legend claims that William King of Philadelphia created this dish in 1915. Another insists that the original name was "Chicken à la Keene," and that it was named after a London-born American staying at the Claridge Hotel in London in 1881, just after his horse had won a major Parisian race. Two American chefs, our friend at Delmonico’s and chef George Greenwald of the Brighton Beach Hotel, claim to have created this dish for two wealthy Americans; one named Keene and the other King back in the 1890s. Whoever invented this dish, its true creator is full of chicken (and also another animal with horns that sometimes fights and sees red with a matador in a ring). The Tortilla Guy
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Margarita: This tequila/lime orange liqueur cocktail has been claimed by many sources and no one can say for sure which one of them is the truth. One legend attributes the cocktail to Dallas socialite, Margarita Samas, who claimed she invented it in 1948 for one of her Acapulco parties. Enrique Bastate Gutierrez boasted that he invented the drink in the 1940s as a tribute to actress, Rita Hayworth, whose real name was Margarita Cansino. Still another unfounded tale connects the drink to an earlier time when Hayworth (who was the daughter of Flamenco dancers) was performing in Tijuana nightclubs under her original name. This second article has covered ice cream named after rock stars, tea christened on behalf of Prime Ministers and cocktails claiming monikers of cinematic fame The Tortilla Guy
CinnamonRed1's picture
Wow! You certainly did your homework! Cool Blog Steve ;)
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Chicken Tetrazzini: Luisa Tetrazzini, operatic soprano also known as the "Florentine Nightingale," is the source of this chicken dish, which was created circa the late 1930s in San Francisco. The Tortilla Guy
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Beef Wellington: The personal chef of Arthur Wellesley, the First Duke of Wellington and British hero of the Battle of Waterloo is most likely the originator of this beef dish with pâté, mushrooms, truffles and Madeira sauce encased in a pastry sauce. Legends vary, but some say the shape of the dish resembles the famous Wellington boot. The Tortilla Guy
ifoodiee's picture
Really interesting information.. I spend more time reading the comments but all that amusing info was worth it!