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Medieval Kitchen Essentials

emilyvyomahallaway's picture


 


Medieval Kitchen EssentialsA medieval kitchen consisted of simple as well as some advanced tools made using iron, clay and wood. Medieval kitchen tools laid the edifice of modern kitchen equipment and hence it is vital to know about the tools used in a medieval kitchen to understand the importance and use of kitchen tools elaborately. Here is a guide to information about Medieval kitchen essentials.


Some essential medieval kitchen tools were:


  1. Kettle


This was generally used in poor European medieval households. Its main use was to simmer stews, porridge and soups. Tea and milk were also boiled in the traditional kettles used and modern versions of this pot are also used e.g. the teapots and coffeepots used commonly.


  1. Stove tops and ovens


These were separate structures as used in medieval times unlike the modern kitchen stoves and ovens. A stove was a long bench of masonry stone that housed deep containers lined with iron or ceramic. Usually these were lighted with fuels like peat and charcoal. Oven , on the other hand were used only by bakers or in manor kitchens since these used a lot of fuel and needed careful handling.


  1. Frying pans


Long handled frying pans were extensively used for frying eggs, fish, and fritters. These looked nothing like the modern frying pans but were sturdy enough for frying. These were usually made of iron and could be found in almost all households.


  1. Colander


To drain pasta and vegetables, Colander was used extensively in an Italian medieval kitchen. During those times also it was used as a strainer or a sieve to filter out liquids or food ground in mortar.


  1. Knives


Knives have been the earliest tools used by humans for a variety of tasks involving procurement and preparation of food. In medieval times these were specifically used to carve bone, or to chop meat and vegetables. These were also used to mince stuffing for meatballs and pies.


  1. Cauldrons


Cauldrons were huge pots made of iron used during medieval times for stirring and cooking meat and vegetables. Usually large or medium sized meat portions were cooked in these large pots which were continuously stirred by a group of people.


  1. Mortar and Pestle


These were mainly used to grind spices, herbs, almonds, bread crumbs, cooked vegetables and meat. This is a kitchen equipment that has been passed down the ages as it is and is used currently without many modifications, though for ease of work it has been replaced in many modern kitchens by many hi-tech gadgets like the food processor and the grinder.Medieval Kitchen Essentials


  1. Spoons and ladles


A variety of wooden spoons and ladles were used in medieval kitchens for stirring and mixing purpose and were a quintessential tool in those times. Gradually the iron and cast iron substitutes replaced the traditional wooden versions which are still in vogue.


 


Hence this summarizes this the development of kitchens across generations from medieval times. Most of the equipment used in that time period has not been replaced but improved upon.


 


Image Credits: dimensionsguide.com


 

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6 Comments

priyam's picture
We continue to use most of these...essentials of any kitchen...good blog.
Samina.Tapia's picture
I love Dutch ovens and cast iron pots and pans and cauldrons that are used for medieval cooking. They are really tough to find these days but are so good for slow cooked foods and impart an excellent flavor to the food as well.
Vinay's picture
Love the Mexican molcajete mixto- meats grilled in the stone pestle! :) The molcajete is the traditional pestle made of volcanic rock which is used to grind salsas and moles, and to grill food!
thot4food's picture
Hmm...we continue to use them despite having modern kitchen tools which we use sparingly
Anonymous's picture
A great blog
Anonymous's picture
I love the stone motar and pestle and use it to grind and crush ingredients to extract maximum flavor which is missing in bottled or ready to use ingredients.