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How To Eat Wild Violets


 


cooking, wild violets, health benefits


How to eat wild violets? Seriously? Who would have thought? But one can actually eat wild violets. Most of the violets are commonly occurring plants. Some people even consider them as weeds. Then again, one man's weed is another man's treasure. The wild violets can be cultivated at home for the sake of convenience. The culinary usage of this flower has been dated back up to the times of the ancient Greeks and Romans. You can eat wild violets in a numerous different ways by including them in various recipes. You can get really creative here and make your own wild violets recipes as well.


 


Eating wild violets is a good thing because they are a rich source of Vitamin C and iron. The Cherokee Indians have used the violets to relieve flu, colds, and digestive ailments. In fact, all they did was to soak the flowers in water, and later drink the 'violet' water. How simpler can things get, eh?


 


Ok, we do know that the violets have some medicinal values. But, what are the different ways to eat wild violets? One of the commonest ways of eating wild violets, or rather drinking wild violets is by brewing them along with the chamomile tea. Voila, you will have the violet tea in hand.


                                                                                                                                                        


You can make the Violet Caesar salad – the regular Caesar salad albeit with a violet twist. In fact, you can eat wild violets as a component of many fruit and vegetable salads. 


                                                                                                                                                            


You can make violet jams and jellies and use them as you may like. Violet jams are typically served with toasts.


                                                                                                                                                     


You can crystallize the wild violets and use them as a decoration. Most of the crystallized violets are used to decorate cakes.


                                                                                                                                                   


Some violets have a mild pea-flavor and they can be used in the preparation of many savory dishes.


                                                                                                                                                       


Interestingly not all violets are edible. The commonly found household plant, the African violet is definitely not edible. And any flower with a tinge of purple or violet color is not edible either. Only the violets that have been classified as edible should be consumed. These edible violets will be available in most herbal stores. Avoid all flowers that have been urinated upon by dogs or have been sprayed by various pesticides. Most importantly, it is wise to consume a very small portion of the wild violets dish, just to see if you have any allergic reaction to it.


 


These are some of the ways to eat wild violets. However, the bottom line is; the use of the wild violet lies in the hands of the cook.


 


Adios!


 


Image Courtesy: flickr.com

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2 Comments

Anonymous's picture
> What kind of ridiculous article is this? Why is the picture showing purple flowers if they're potentially poisonous? You must realize that most people will not even read the article, and only see the picture and think "ooo, pretty violets, I'm going to go pick those pretty purple flowers in my yard and eat them!"
Ruairi's picture
I have sugared my purple violets and eaten them. You also can eat purple violas and pansy's whats up with this?